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Typical glass foams

DOI: 10.1615/thermopedia.0000170


In many natural phenomena, materials processing, and manufactural situations, gas bubbles can form in liquid and solid phases. Their presence affects the thermophysical and radiative properties of the two-phase system and, hence, the transport phenomena. The glass melting process in industrial furnaces where bubbles are generated by chemical reactions is a typical example. In the last decade, several studies have focused on the radiative properties of typical glass foams. Fedorov and Viskanta (2000), Fedorov and Pilon (2002), and Pilon and Viskanta (2003) have been interested in low-density glass foam (about 10-30%). Rousseau et al. (2007a,b), Baillis et al. (2004), Dombrovsky et al. (2005), and Randri ...

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